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Vaccine Social

Social Media and Infographics Toolkit

Use this toolkit to share scientific COVID-19 vaccine information with your friends and family!

Share the Pledge

Share this pledge on social to make sure your community knows they can join our week of action!


Social Copy #WeDemandMore & @ItsMadetoSave are launching #WeDemandMore Vaccines for All Women Week of Action to get more women #vaxxed + fight misinformation about vaccines. Join us in the fight for #ShotsForAll at usow.org/vaccines

Image Description: a graphic with a black background and yellow and white text says vaccines for all women week of action. Save the date May 17 to 21. On the right is a photo of a person with long dark hair receiving their vaccine

Share our Infographics

Share this series of infographics on social to make sure your community has scientific information about the COVID-19 vaccines! We recommend utilizing the graphics series as an in-feed post the below as a caption, but you can also utilize it for Instagram Stories or as an individual post!


Social Copy If you want to learn more about the COVID-19 vaccines, visit CDC.gov, @itsmadetosave, your local public health department, or talk with your doctor or nurse. 

Visit Vaccines.gov to find the closest vaccine to you. You can also text your zip code to 438829 or call 1-800-232-0233. 

The COVID-19 vaccine is free for all people with or without insurance.

Image Descriptions: We Demand More logo in the top left corner. Yellow Writing on black background says “Why is there less confidence in the vaccine among Black, Indigenous, Latino, and other people of color?” Underneath the text in white writing, it says “Black, Latino, Indigenous communities, as well as other communities of color, deal with historic and ongoing abuse, racism, and discrimination by health care providers and the medical establishment. Medical research has been largely dominated by white, cisgender men. There is a long history of cisgender and transgender women and other birthing people not being believed about their own bodies or having their concerns questioned or ignored, which can have deadly consequences.” There is a yellow bar in the bottom left corner. 

Image Description: We Demand More logo in the top left corner. Yellow Writing on black background says “Is the J&J Vaccine Safe?” Underneath the text in white writing, it says “In April 2021, the J&J vaccine was put on hold to investigate 6 reports of blood clots. After a review by the FDA & CDC, J&J has been cleared for use. The J&J vaccine is safe for use by all genders, requires only one dose and offers full protection against COVID-19 two weeks after vaccination.” There is a yellow bar in the bottom left corner. 

Image Description: We Demand More logo in the top left corner. Yellow Writing on black background says “Is the vaccine recommended and/or safe if I’m pregnant or lactating?” Underneath the text in bold white writing, it says “Yes.” In regular white text, it says “If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, the CDC recommends that you get the vaccine. The CDC recently released a vaccination study on over 30,000 pregnant people. No unexpected outcomes were observed and side effects did not indicate any safety concerns. Pregnant people are more likely to die or get very sick from COVID-19 and pregnant people with COVID-19 may have a higher risk of complications, including early birth.”  There is a yellow bar in the bottom left corner. 

Image Description: We Demand More logo in the top left corner. Yellow Writing on black background says “Does the vaccine cause infertility sterility or miscarriage? Does it affect my period?” Underneath the text in bold white writing, it says “The COVID-19 vaccine doesn’t make you sterile, impact your fertility, or cause miscarriage. There is no evidence that vaccinated people have issues getting pregnant.” In regular white text, it says “You can experience irregular periods after getting the vaccine. While the fact that vaccine study participants were not asked about their periods reveals the systemic gender inequality in medicine, there is no research to show that menstruating people shouldn’t get the vaccine..”  There is a yellow bar in the bottom left corner. 

Image Description: We Demand More logo in the top left corner. Yellow Writing on black background says “When during pregnancy should I get vaccinated?” Underneath the text in bold white writing, it says “Get the vaccine as soon as possible.” In regular white text, it says “There is no time during pregnancy where you should not get the vaccine, You do not need to delay pregnancy until after you are vaccinated. If you find out you are pregnant after the first dose of Pfizer or Moderna, you should still get the second dose to ensure full protection.”  There is a yellow bar in the bottom left corner. 

Image Description: We Demand More logo in the top left corner. Yellow Writing on black background says “One of the potential side effects of the vaccine is a fever. What should I do if I’m pregnant and get a fever after getting vaccinated?” In white text, it says “If you experience a fever after your vaccination, you can take acetaminophen, like Tylenol. Acetaminophen is safe for use in pregnancy and does not interfere with the effectiveness of the vaccine. If you still have concerns, please reach out to your doctor or nurse..”  There is a yellow bar in the bottom left corner.

Image Description: We Demand More logo in the top left corner. Yellow Writing on black background says “Will the vaccine cause autism or developmental issues in children?” In white text, it says “Vaccines do not cause autism. COVID-19 vaccines do not change your DNA. There is nothing in the vaccines that can be passed down genetically to children.”  There is a yellow bar in the bottom left corner. 

Image Description: We Demand More logo in the top left corner. Yellow Writing on black background says “Is the vaccine recommended for children?” In white text, it says “The FDA recently announced that Pfizer is approved for ages 12-15, as well as anyone 16 and older. Pfizer is currently the only vaccine available for people ages 12-15, but other vaccine makers are evaluating data for use in children and teenagers. Symptoms in this age group are similar to other eligible age groups. Vaccinating children is vital to ending the pandemic and getting students back to school in the fall. ”  There is a yellow bar in the bottom left corner.